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PubMed
Articles by:
Rüber, L.
Verheyen, E.
Meyer, A.
and links to:
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 August 31; 96 (18): 1023010235
Evolution

Replicated evolution of trophic specializations in an endemic cichlid fish lineage from Lake Tanganyika
Lukas Rüber,* Erik Verheyen,§ and Axel Meyer

* Zoological Museum, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland; § Section of Taxonomy and Biochemical Systematics, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Vautierstraat 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium; and Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany.

Communicated by Thomas W. Schoener, University of California, Davis, CA, June 14, 1999 (received for review December 10, 1999)

Present address: Section of Taxonomy and Biochemical Systematics, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Vautierstraat 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium.
To whom reprint requests should be addressed. E-mail: ruber@kbinirsnb.be.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

 Abstract 
 

The current phylogenetic hypothesis for the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes of the tribe Eretmodini is based solely on morphology and suggests that more complex trophic morphologies derived only once from a less specialized ancestral condition. A molecular phylogeny of eretmodine cichlids based on partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b and control-region sequences was used to reconstruct the evolutionary sequence of trophic adaptations and to test alternative models of morphological divergence. The six mitochondrial lineages found disagree with the current taxonomy and the morphology-based phylogeny. Mitochondrial lineages with similar trophic morphologies are not grouped monophyletically but are typically more closely related to lineages with different trophic phenotypes currently assigned to other genera. Our results indicate multiple independent origins of similar trophic specializations in these cichlids. A pattern of repeated divergent morphological evolution becomes apparent when the phylogeography of the mitochondrial haplotypes is analyzed in the context of the geological and paleoclimatological history of Lake Tanganyika. In more than one instance within Lake Tanganyika, similar morphological divergence of dentitional traits occurred in sympatric species pairs. Possibly, resource-based divergent selective regimes led to resource partitioning and brought about similar trophic morphologies independently and repeatedly.

Eretmodini | phylogeny | adaptive radiation